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20121027
20121104
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series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
right on par with civil rights of the 1960's. let's end the drug wars. legalize marijuana now. [applause] let's repeal the patriot act. [cheers and applause] i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. that's the reason we fought wars in this country. [cheers and applause] i promise to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is a 1.4 trillion reduction in federal spending. if we don't do this now, we are going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse and a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have in our pockets don't buy a thing because of the acome anying inflation -- because of the accompanying inflation that goes along with every dollar we spend. thathe only candidate wants to eliminate income tax, eliminate corporate tax, abolish the i.r.s. and replace all of that with one federal consumption tax, the fair tax. i think it is the answer to our exports, it is the answer to american jobs. [applause] >> in what way way does the war on drugs
unman e drones however some civil rights have privacy issueshey're hoping this small aircraft could help with other law-enforcement agencies. >> for a search and rescue, squad, fire arms, rural areas. not easily accessible by a patrol car those types of situations. it could be a tremendous search help. >> the advantage is attractive. about a low amount of fuel on a helicopter. $1500 per helicopter. the shares to it is attractive. >> to lower the amount of fuel in a helicopter which is $1,500 per hour for a helicopter however, these are only $2,200 per month to park and has avoided the unmanned aircraft and privacy concerns that arise. >> when they think of a drone... drones that fly over pakistan. or a-grown but this is a quad helicopter. the about privacy concerns are always a concern for us. we have that robots and that and on the bomb squad and in the worst bomb squads for remote control. we do not roll closed down the road this is mission however specific. if we have a person that is fired off a gun and we can deploy this and nothing that the public would have a problem with that. o
was an evangelical preacher who idolized america. >> i studied civil rights and slavery. i was so affected by an american story that was so different from the way that i had seen our country. i remember just being furious, you know. >> reporter: it's that fury and indignation that have fueled rickard's work but because he's not on the scene taking the photographs, it's also controversial. on-line viewer comments can range from compelling and fascinating work to... >> this guy says lazy, pathetic and entirely uninteresting. so it's all over the board. people have commented that i'm not even a photographer. >> of course it's photography. yeah, i think that what doug is doing is looking through the... through google as part of his lens. the internet is helping redefine what it means to be a photographer. >> you see this? then you come right into here. there's damage. >> reporter: in fact, rickard says in an ocean of digital imagery creating something special is becoming more and more difficult. no matter how easy the tools are. >> i think it really boils down to what you bring to it. you know
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
for one minute rebuttal. markell: psychiatry arne duncan says and i agree that education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware and closing the chief of the gatt which we keep a close eye on. the achievement gap we want to raise the achieve of all students, and that is exactly what we are doing. i am more excited about what is going on in public schools in delaware today than i've ever been. my wife and i. she went all the way through the schools right here in newark, but i'm more excited today. we came in first place in two and half years ago on race to the top. it's one thing to win a competition and now we are implementing it and making progress. we just announced two months ago that it ended in june 2000 market for proficient in reading and 9,000 more proficient enough in the year before. i want you to speak to the racial difference. we know that achievement gap. i thought you were asking about all the folks >> moderator: the only significant investment we are making we have a lot of african-american kids as our significant commitment to early chi
of the series with the civil rights history in america. that was kind of a fundamental place from each of them also worked on a documentary series deal the following country but i learned by working in production and then bike immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to that best practices thing that happens in institutions. where you're not just struggling to make the thing, you're actually talking about and you also have community and resources. i think if you can afford it, i think that it's certainly a powerful river i just happened to have learned the hard as we possible can which is used by working in production, not doing anything else. >> is the issue here the kind of method, the institutions and the sort of patterns of careers that allows people to train to the sort of watchdog type stuff, whether they were exactly journalists or did someone thinks? are those drawing up? i mean -- >> i mean, documentary film is interesting because in some ways i think that's a really exist at a british ship model is part of how you become a film maker. but i think in jour
because they've been right at "the new york times" jobs to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. that got me thinking, whose job is at? if it's not going to be the times they are going to shut up private plans, at least sort of a vacuum. i would've thought responsible government would leave that felt by the government as opposed to by law professors and centers for national security. so as i said at the beginning, i do agree with john at the debate is not in any significant regard difference in so far as the tensions from what has been really for the better part of the last seven years. i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability and at least uncomfortable with. and maybe that's just because i'm a law professor who happens to spend time in the trenches like these guys. >> i think it's a little uncomfortable to talk about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has been occurred. the question has been life to the ngos, the think tanks, the press committees are to figure out who exactly is responsib
bay, civil liberties, there is something that animated the hatred on the left. for the right, it wasn't specifically foreign policy and civil liberties. we have a president is that is not only largely continuing the same foreign policy as its predecessor, but expanding it in ways that the left would not accept. when bush was there, the patriot act, to put people away without due process. obama has said we can imprison american citizens. not just enemy combatants, but citizens. never any questions asked. how do you see with obama now doing bush on things with the continuation of undeclared wars, how do you see foreign policy from a liberal perspective considering that obama has considered so many of his predecessors policies and expand on them. >> obama himself has not interpreted it as saying that we have the right to be maki said that we have the power, but i won't do it. >> i don't think that's quite accurate. it's a very vague sentence in the bill, it said any more power that is specifically about foreign terrorists, that they have the right to take american citizens willy-nilly in
in investigating. it's not the "new york times'" job to do the work of human rights and civil liberty groups. that got me thinking. well, then, whose job is it? if it's not the times', and you shut out plaintiffs in the information; that leaves a vacuum, and i thought the responsible thing would be to fill it by the government opposed to law professors and centers for national security. as i said in the beginning, i agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different in as far as the tensions what's been really for the better part of the better part of the last 70 years, but i think that we are leaning more towards a lack of public accountability than i'm comfortable with, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, a law professor not in the trenches like these guys. >> it's uncomfortable to talking about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has not occurred, and the question has been left to the ngos, the think tanks, the press to sort of figure out, well, who exactly is responsible for braining that accou
happened. is that right? and if it's not right, please explain. are the afghans involved? civil society involved? how does that -- give us a little bit of insight into how one of those investigations -- >> let me start and then doug can give the ground sense of this. whenever there is a sieve yang casual -- civilian casualty, there is a jointly-led investigation with afghans. it is taken extremely seriously to get to the truth of this. >> and, of course, on some occasions it's difficult to do that because of the nature of the, of the incident. this is jointly delivered, and it is recorded as such. >> thank you very much. the joint investigation team would be led by an officer who comes from the southwest with his partner, an afghan, and from the provincial side of it calling in members of the afghan security forces as required and then members of the district government as well. so it goes on over a period of time. there's been an initial visit by that team, and there have also been other areas in order to collect other pieces of evidence to make their understanding whole, and they woul
, and that was basically a number of people representing the different religious and civil institutions in the country. this group of people, together, they issued a number of very important documents relating to citizenship and how the most important element in the future of egypt was the right of citizenship for every egyptian respective of race, irrespective of religion, irrespective of wealth of the this was a country that we were going to build for all our citizens, and then there was a number of -- another important document that was produced, and that was relating to the basic rights, like, the rights -- the right to believe in whatever form you want. the right to express yourself. the right to be creative, and now they are working on a third document which is related to women's issues in general so these groups are both religious and civil society groups who came together in order to point the way for the future, and this is particularly important for two reasons. first, out of the revolution, we have a people that's been empowered. a people that feels that, and i call it the "revolution," and
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the sa
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)